rulururu

post Q&A

August 7th, 2008

Filed under: Question & Answer — admin @ 7:17 pm

Q&A

Question:
Was there an official branding iron in The High Chaparral episodes? If so, what did it look like?

Answer:
Yes. The Cannon cattle were branded with a basic ‘HC’. Kent McCray provided the background story behind how this brand was made: “The HC brand was made for the episode and it was used periodically. It was not used in the pilot. The prop man had the Paramount metal department make it up for the show.”

The brand can be seen briefly in the branding scene from Bad Day for a Thirst – click the photo to see the video clip. While searching for a scene that would show the Chaparral brand, I wondered how hard it was to get the actors to learn how to handle cows, and this caused Kent to laugh at my mistake, since obviously the show had stuntmen and wranglers to handle the animals. Actors do what they do best – act!

High Chaparral branding iron can be seen in this clip from the episode Bad Day for a Thirst

The High Chaparral brand can be seen in this screen capture
from Bad Day for a Thirst. Click the photo to see the video clip.
Having Trouble reading this email? Open the newsletter in a web browser.

Question:
I was watching “The Arrangement” the other night and thought I heard the “standard”
Victoria theme in that. I thought there were two Victoria themes? I know there is a different one–I need to figure out which is Sukman and which is Rose, because I think I have them confused. What I hear when Victoria enters the dining room at Casa Montoya in “The Arrangement” is what I always thought was the Harry Sukman Victoria, because I hear it in the other episodes.

Answer:
The theme you hear for Victoria in the pilot episode (The Arrangement) was written by David Rose. The U.S. Copyright site lists two entries for Victoria, One attributed to David Rose in 1969 and another in 1970 by David Rose, arranged by Matt Dennis.

However, as with all the regular episode character themes, the music you’re hearing for Victoria (and the rest of the Montoyas when it’s a serious theme) in the remainder of the episodes is the lovely Montoya Theme by Harry Sukman. This piece of music was a particular favorite of David Dortort.

Susan Sukman McCray provided background information about the two themes and the copyright dates in this message: message from Susan McCray. In it, Susan says, “As far as the theme for Victoria goes, David Rose only composed the music for the pilot of High Chaparral.  The pilot was in 1966.  Harry Sukman composed all character themes and background music scores for all the episodes of The High Chaparral. The pilot music was done by David Rose. I just looked at my High Chaparral book, which has all the music and themes, and I find Victoria, written by David Rose, arranged by Matt Dennis.  The copyright is 1969 and 70. The reason being, the copyright which originally was under David Rose in 1966, was transferred to Open Door Music, which is a publishing company owned by David Dortort.  All of the music after 1967 was transferred into the Open Door Music Company for publishing.  I think that may clear it up.  That includes all Harry Sukman music as well, so you will find the 1969-70 date on The High Chaparral music by David Rose, even though it was only composed for the pilot in 66.”

In this composite video clip, listen to the David Rose theme from the pilot episode The Arrangement, followed by a unique scene in a second season episode, The Promised Land. In it, Victoria plays the Harry Sukman Montoya Theme during the dialog.

Linda Cristal as Victoria Cannon in The High Chaparral

Click on the photo to see the composite video and hear both the David Rose and Harry Sukman music
themes associated with Victoria.

Having Trouble reading this email? Open the newsletter in a web browser.

Question:
The quote ‘brand ’em, don’t bar-be-que ’em’ came up in discussion on the fan boards – what scene is this from, and is it really used more than once?

Answer:
This catch-phrase is indeed used twice in The High Chaparral. It appears first in the pilot episode Destination Tucson, when Big John Cannon uses it to chastize Blue for his inexperience. Later in episode 26, Bad Day for a Thirst, Blue quotes his father when he uses what would be almost a year’s worth of experience to teach Buck’s Apache proteges Sourdough and Saddleblanket how to brand a cow.

ark Slade as Blue Cannon wrestles a steer in the pilot episode

In this scene from the pilot episode Destination Tucson, Blue Cannon wrestles a steer, but his inexperience at branding displeases his father. Click the photo to view the video clip.
Having Trouble reading this email? Open the newsletter in a web browser.

Mark Slade as Blue Cannon in Bad Day for a Thirst

In this scene from Bad Day for a Thirst, Blue demonstrates proper branding technique to one
of Buck’s new Apache ranch hands.
Click the photo to see the video.
Having Trouble reading this email? Open the newsletter in a web browser.

No Comments »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

ruldrurd